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Tropical Storm Beta to Crawl Near Texas Coast With a Threat of Flooding Rainfall, Including in Houston

Tropical Storm Beta to Crawl Near Texas Coast With a Threat of Flooding Rainfall, Including in Houston

At a Glance

  • Tropical Storm Beta made landfall on the middle Texas coast late Monday night.

  • Beta will track near or just inland from the Texas coast through Wednesday.

  • There is a high risk of excessive rainfall on the upper Texas coast on Tuesday, including Houston.

  • Beta could also produce locally heavy rain and flooding from Louisiana into the lower Mississippi Valley.

  • Coastal flooding from storm surge has already occurred and will continue on the Texas and Louisiana coasts.

Tropical Storm Beta will track near the Texas Gulf Coast through Wednesday, where it could produce significant flash flooding, including in the Houston metro area. Beta will also produce areas of lingering coastal flooding and gusty winds.

Happening Now
Beta remains a tropical storm and is moving slowly just inland from the middle Texas coast. The storm made landfall around 10 p.m. CDT on Monday night along the Matagorda Peninsula.

Bands of heavy rain and thunderstorms from Beta are spreading through the middle and upper Texas coastline this morning.

Some of the heaviest so far has fallen in southern parts of the Houston metro. Rainfall totals of 6 to 11 inches have been measured in this area in the 24 hours ending 8 a.m. CDT Tuesday.

Several locations in the south Houston metro area are seeing road flooding this morning and travel should be avoided.

NOAA’s Weather Prediction Center has issued a high risk of excessive rainfall and flooding for Tuesday on the upper Texas coast, including Houston. This means there could be more significant flash flooding from heavy rainfall in this area today.

Forecast
Future Track, Intensity

Beta is forecast to move very slowly, or even stall, just inland from the middle Texas coast on Tuesday and Tuesday night.

By Wednesday, Beta should begin to move more northeastward near or just inland from the upper Texas coast as it weakens to a tropical depression. Beta should become a remnant low by Thursday as it moves into the lower Mississippi Valley.

Flooding Rainfall

Heavy rainfall and flooding will be the main threat from Beta going forward since the storm is moving slowly.

The heaviest rainfall totals will be on the middle and upper Texas coast, including parts of Houston. That’s where the National Hurricane Center predicts an additional 6 to 10 inches, with locally up to 20 inches of rainfall.

Significant flash flooding and urban flooding could occur in these areas through Tuesday.

There could be localized rainfall totals of 3 to 5 inches farther inland from the coast as far north and east as the ArkLaTex Region and the lower Mississippi Valley through the end of the week. This rainfall could produce localized flash flooding in these areas.

It’s important to note that not every location in the areas mentioned above will see rainfall amounts this high or flooding.

Flash flood watches have been issued by the National Weather Service from the middle Texas coast to southeast Louisiana, including Houston, Lake Charles and New Orleans.

Storm Surge

Coastal flooding from Beta’s storm surge has already occurred since Saturday along parts of the Texas and Louisiana coasts.

Water levels were running over 3 feet above normal on Tuesday morning at several tidal gauges on the upper Texas coast near Galveston Bay. That has resulted in moderate or major coastal flooding in some areas.

A storm surge between 3 to 4 feet was measured early Monday morning in many of the same locations. The gauges indicated that this amount of water rise resulted in major coastal flooding.

San Luis Pass, Texas, had a peak storm surge of 4.15 feet on Monday morning.

Modest surge flooding was also reported along Corpus Christi Bay, in Port O’Connor and southwest of Freeport, Texas, among other locations Monday.

There’s also been coastal flooding in Louisiana and Mississippi, reaching moderate levels in some areas, including near Lake Pontchartrain.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) notes that there is a danger of life-threatening storm surge near times of high tide through Tuesday morning in the storm surge warning area of Texas. Bouts of coastal flooding could persist through midweek at high tide as far east southeast Louisiana and southern Mississippi as onshore winds persist there.

Here’s the current storm surge forecast from the NHC, if the peak surge occurs at times of high tide.

Winds

Tropical-storm-force wind gusts (39 mph or greater) could continue today in the tropical storm warning area, from Port Aransas, Texas, to Sabine Pass, Texas. The strongest winds will be in the offshore waters.

Tornadoes

A few tornadoes are also possible on the middle and upper Texas Coast and in southwest Louisiana through Tuesday.

Tropical Storm Beta Nearing Texas Coast With Threats of Flooding Rain, Storm Surge and Gusty Winds

Tropical Storm Beta Nearing Texas Coast With Threats of Flooding Rain, Storm Surge and Gusty Winds

At a Glance

  • Tropical Storm Beta is nearing the Texas Coast.

  • After landfall, Beta will drift northeastward on the Texas coast Monday night through Wednesday.

  • The storm will pose a threat of flooding rainfall, particularly in parts of Texas and Louisiana.

  • Coastal flooding from storm surge has already occurred on the Texas and Louisiana coasts.

  • Tropical-storm-force winds will affect parts of coastal Texas through Monday.

Tropical Storm Beta is nearing the northwest Gulf Coast and poses threats of flooding rainfall, storm surge and gusty winds to parts of Texas and Louisiana into midweek.

Current Alerts
A tropical storm warning is in effect from Port Aransas, Texas, to Morgan City, Louisiana, including Houston and Victoria, Texas, and Cameron, Louisiana. Tropical storm conditions (winds 39 mph or greater) will spread across southwestern Louisiana and coastal Texas through Monday.

A storm surge warning is also in effect from Port Aransas, Texas, to the Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana, including Copano Bay, Aransas Bay, San Antonio Bay, Matagorda Bay, Galveston Bay, Sabine Lake and Lake Calcasieu

Happening Now
Beta is centered just over 100 miles south-southwest of Galveston, Texas, and is moving westward at over 5 mph. Maximum sustained winds in Beta are 50 mph.

Satellite imagery shows that Beta is not well organized this morning since it continues to battle dry air and unfavorable upper-level winds. However, the storm is still bringing several impacts.

Showers and thunderstorms from Beta are affecting parts of Louisiana and Texas right now.

Portions of the Texas and Louisiana coasts in the storm surge warning area have been experiencing coastal flooding at times of high tide since Saturday.

A storm surge between 3 to 4 feet has been measured early Monday morning at several tidal gauges on the upper Texas coast, including around Galveston Bay. The gauges indicated that this amount of water rise has resulted in major coastal flooding in some areas.

San Luis Pass, Texas, had a peak storm surge of 4.15 feet on Monday morning.

Beta’s occasional tropical-storm-force wind gusts have also reached parts of the upper and middle Texas coastline. Those winds are mostly located to the north of Beta’s circulation center, as depicted in the map below.

Forecast Track and Intensity
Beta is forecast to track steadily to the west through Monday night toward the middle Texas coastline.

The storm will continue to battle dry air and wind shear, which should prevent any major intensification from occurring before the storm makes landfall.

Landfall of Beta’s center on the Texas coast should occur sometime later Monday. However, impacts like rainfall, coastal flooding and gusty winds have arrived well in advance of that.

After Beta makes landfall, the system is expected to curl slowly north and then northeast near or inland from the Gulf Coast toward the lower Mississippi Valley as it weakens. That will result in bouts of heavy rainfall in some of the areas near and well east of its path into late week.

Forecast Impacts
Flooding Rainfall

Beta is a slow-moving storm, and that means it poses a threat of flooding rainfall.

(MORE: A Hurricane’s Forward Speeds Can Be As Important as Its Intensity)

Areas from southern Louisiana and the middle and upper Texas coast could see 5 to 10 inches of rainfall, with isolated totals up to 15 inches possible, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). There could be localized rainfall totals of 3 to 5 inches farther inland from the coast as far north and east as the ArkLaTex Region and the lower Mississippi Valley through the end of the week.

Flash flooding and urban flooding will impact some of these areas and there could river flooding as well, according to the NHC.

It’s important to note that not every location in the areas mentioned above will see rainfall amounts this high or flooding. The heaviest rainfall will be near where the storm’s circulation center tracks, and in bands well to its east.

Flash flood watches have been issued by the National Weather Service from the middle Texas coast to southern Louisiana, including Houston, Lake Charles and New Orleans.

Beta is not expected to produce rainfall that is anywhere comparable to Hurricane Harvey (2017) or Tropical Storm Imelda (2019).

Storm Surge

Coastal flooding from Beta’s storm surge has already occurred since Saturday along parts of the Texas and Louisiana coasts.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) notes that there is a danger of life-threatening storm surge near times of high tide through Tuesday in the storm surge warning area of Texas and Louisiana. Bouts of coastal flooding could persist through midweek at high tide as far east southeast Louisiana and southern Mississippi as onshore winds persist there.

Storm surge in combination with heavy rainfall could only worsen flooding near the coast early this week.

Here’s the current storm surge forecast from the NHC, if the peak surge occurs at times of high tide.

Winds

Tropical-storm-force winds are already occurring at times on the immediate Texas coast and will continue there through Tuesday.

Stronger gusts could trigger sporadic power outages and might down some trees, particularly in areas where the soil becomes saturated from heavy rainfall. Major wind damage is not expected from Beta.

Hurricane, Storm Surge Watches Issued for Texas, Louisiana Coasts Ahead of Tropical Storm Beta

Hurricane, Storm Surge Watches Issued for Texas, Louisiana Coasts Ahead of Tropical Storm Beta

At a Glance

  • Tropical Storm Beta is several hundred miles east of Brownsville, TX.

  • New watches have been issued for portions of the Texas and Louisiana coasts.

  • This system may meander in the western Gulf the next several days. Where this system ultimately ends up remains highly uncertain.

  • This slow mover is a potential flood danger along the western Gulf Coast.

Tropical Storm Beta will meander in the western Gulf of Mexico into next week and poses a major threat of rainfall and coastal flooding to the Texas and Louisiana coasts.

New watches have been issued for the entire Texas coast and a portion of the Louisiana coast, including the area of coastal Louisiana hit by Hurricane Laura a few weeks ago.

Beta’s formation is the 10th Atlantic named storm to form so far this month, which is the most on record for any September, according to Dr. Phil Klotzbach. September is typically the most active month of the hurricane season.

Current Alerts
A Hurricane Watch has been issued from Port Aransas, Texas to High Island, Texas, including Galveston. Hurricane conditions are possible in this area on Monday, with tropical storm conditions possible by late Sunday.

A storm surge watch has been issued from Port Mansfield, Texas to Cameron, Louisiana, including Baffin Bay, Corpus Christi Bay, Copano Bay, Aransas Bay, San Antonio Bay, Matagorda Bay, Galveston Bay, Sabine Lake and Calcasieu Lake.

A tropical storm watch has been issued from south of Port Aransas to the Mouth of the Rio Grande and east of High Island to Morgan City, Louisiana. Tropical storm conditions are possible in this area by late Saturday.

Beta’s Forecast
With plenty of warm ocean water and lessening wind shear, this system is expected to intensify gradually through the weekend. Some dry air and wind shear are hindering Beta’s circulation this morning.

How strong it will become remains uncertain but is currently expected to become a hurricane. Water temperatures are very warm, which supports intensification, and wind shear should remain low to moderate, at most. However, it could be impacted by some dry air and it could eventually churn up enough cooler water below the surface to keep a lid on its intensification.

Beta’s center may hop around over the next few days as it tries to keep up with the thunderstorms that will power Beta over the next week or so. This will likely lead to jumps in the forecast left and right.

Even without the jumps in the forecast, this system has a number of twists and turns in its future.

First, a weak upper-level low over Texas should help nudge this system north over the next day or so.

But then that upper-low will weaken and move away, leaving the system steered by a weak area of high pressure setting up over the south-central U.S. by early next week that should cause Beta to hang a left and bend it slowly westward. This should be the most prevalent motion through the weekend and possibly into Monday.

After that, a dip in the jet stream and some lower pressures over the South may pick up Beta and take it northeastward by the middle part of next week, near or over the Texas or Louisiana coasts.

It certainly won’t be in any hurry for the next several days.

Slow-moving tropical cyclones can be prolific rainfall producers, as we saw along the Gulf Coast and inland with Hurricane Sally.

Given Beta’s slow movement, heavy rainfall and flooding is an increasing danger near the Texas coast and possibly the Louisiana coast through next week.

Given the numerous changes in forward direction and upper-level winds, the zone of heaviest rainfall will likely change from day to day.

Increased surf and rip currents are also expected from northeastern Mexico to the northern Gulf Coast, beginning as soon as this weekend.

The National Weather Service notes that significant coastal flooding is possible on the middle and upper Texas coast beginning Saturday morning and continuing through at least Tuesday morning, and minor coastal flooding might be possible in southwestern Louisiana late this weekend.

Persistent onshore flow and a possible storm surge component in combination with heavy rainfall could only worsen flooding near the coast into next week.

Here’s the current storm surge forecast from the National Hurricane Center:

For now, all interests near the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coasts should monitor closely the progress of this system and have their hurricane plans ready to go ahead of time in case it’s needed.
Tropical Depression Twenty-Two Is Expected to Become Tropical Storm Wilfred in the Western Gulf of Mexico

Tropical Depression Twenty-Two Is Expected to Become Tropical Storm Wilfred in the Western Gulf of Mexico

  • A new tropical depression has formed in the southwest Gulf of Mexico.

  • This system may meander in the western Gulf the next several days.

  • Where this system ultimately ends up remains highly uncertain due to weak steering winds.

Tropical Depression Twenty-Two is forecast to become a tropical storm and will meander in the western Gulf of Mexico before potentially impacting parts of the coast of Texas or northeast Mexico next week.

This newly-formed system was designated a tropical depression early Thursday evening after a Hurricane Hunter aircraft mission found a closed low-pressure circulation with sufficient thunderstorms near it.

With little wind shear and plenty of warm ocean water, this system is expected to become a tropical storm soon. The next Atlantic Basin tropical storm will be named Wilfred.

How strong it will become remains uncertain. Water temperatures are very warm, which supports intensification, and wind shear should remain low to moderate, at most. However, it could be impacted by some dry air and it could eventually churn up enough cooler water below the surface to keep a lid on its intensification.

It certainly won’t be in any hurry for the next several days.

A weak upper-level low over Texas should help nudge this system north over the next day or so.

But then that upper-low will weaken and move away, leaving the system steered by a weak area of high pressure setting up over the south-central U.S. by early next week that could bend it slowly westward.

At this point, the key takeaway for anyone from the northeastern Mexican coast to Louisiana is to keep an eye on this tropical system in the western Gulf of Mexico over the next several days.

Regardless of development, tropical moisture will increase along parts of the Gulf Coast into next week.

Locally heavy rainfall is possible near portions of the immediate coast, which could lead to flooding. Where the heaviest rain falls will be determined by the track of this system.

Increased surf and rip currents are also expected from northeastern Mexico to the northern Gulf Coast. This high surf is expected to last for several days, with at least some minor coastal flooding possible in some areas.

Record Early Streak Continues?
The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has been very active and 17 of the 20 named storms have set records in terms of how early a certain letter storm was named. There were even two named storms before the season’s official June 1 start.

If this system becomes Wilfred, it will be the earliest 21st named storm on record. The current record for the earliest Atlantic 21st named storm is Vince on Oct. 8, 2005.

Wilfred is the last name on the Atlantic Basin list this year and the next named system would then use the Greek alphabet. The only other year to use Greek letters was 2005.

Hurricane Sally Crawling Toward Gulf Coast With Life-Threatening Storm Surge and Potentially Historic Flooding Rainfall

Hurricane Sally Crawling Toward Gulf Coast With Life-Threatening Storm Surge and Potentially Historic Flooding Rainfall

  • Hurricane Sally is moving slowly in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  • Sally’s slow movement will result in prolonged impacts on the Gulf Coast.

  • Life-threatening storm surge is expected, particularly in parts of southeast Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle.

  • Flooding rain is a major threat from Sally on the Gulf Coast and farther inland across the Southeast this week.

  • Rainfall totals of up to 30 inches could result in historic flooding near and just inland from the northern Gulf Coast.

  • Damaging winds are expected near where Sally’s center crosses the coast.

Hurricane Sally is moving slowly toward the northern Gulf Coast, where it will bring a dangerous storm surge, potentially historic flooding rainfall and damaging winds through Wednesday. Sally will also pose a threat of flooding rainfall farther inland across parts of the Southeast.

Follow the advice of local officials if you are ordered to evacuate an area prone to flooding from storm surge.

Current Alerts
A hurricane warning has been issued from east of Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, to Navarre, Florida, including Biloxi, Mobile and Pensacola. Hurricane conditions (winds 74 mph or greater) are expected in some parts of this area late Tuesday into Wednesday.

Tropical storm warnings are in effect to west and east of this hurricane warning, including portions of southeast Louisiana and the Florida Panhandle.

A storm surge warning is also in effect from the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton County Line in Florida, including Mobile Bay. This means there will be a danger of life-threatening inundation from storm surge within the warning area in the next 36 hours.

Happening Now
Sally is centered 105 miles south of Mobile, Alabama. Maximum sustained winds are 80 mph, making Sally a Category 1 hurricane.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles from the center of the storm.

Bands of heavy rain and tropical-storm-force winds are affecting the northern Gulf Coast right now, particularly in parts of the Florida Panhandle, southern Alabama and southeast Mississippi. A wind gust to 59 mph was recently clocked on Dauphin Island, Alabama.

Moderate coastal flooding from Sally’s storm surge has already occurred today at various tidal gauges from southeast Louisiana to Mississippi, Alabama and the western Florida Panhandle.

The coastal flooding has inundated some low-lying areas near the coast.

Track, Intensity Forecast
Sally is expected to turn more northward later Tuesday into Wednesday. The track of Sally has also shifted more eastward and landfall is now most likely to occur sometime on Wednesday morning from southeast Mississippi to Alabama and the western Florida Panhandle.

No significant additional strengthening is forecast because of multiple factors, including increasingly unfavorable upper-level winds.

However, the lack of additional strengthening does not reduce the serious danger Sally poses to the northern Gulf coast. Its slow forward speed will result in prolonged impacts from flooding rainfall, storm surge and strong winds.

Here’s a look at what to expect.

Forecast Impacts
Storm Surge, High Surf

A potentially life-threatening storm surge is expected along the northern Gulf Coast through Wednesday. This could be exacerbated by heavy rainfall occurring in areas experiencing storm surge.

Below is a look at the locations with the highest storm surge forecast for the Gulf Coast if peak surge occurs at the time of high tide, according to the National Hurricane Center. The next high tide in most of the area below is late Wednesday morning or early Wednesday afternoon.

-4 to 7 feet from the Mississippi/Alabama border to the Alabama/Florida border, including Mobile Bay.

-4 to 6 feet from the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana to the mouth of the Pearl River in Mississippi.

-3 to 5 feet from the mouth of the Pearl River in Mississippi to the Mississippi/Alabama border, and from the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton County line in Florida, including Pensacola Bay and Choctawhatchee Bay

The peak storm surge will be near and to the right of where the center of Sally makes landfall on Wednesday. Large waves could worsen the storm surge impacts in some areas and cause significant beach erosion on much of the northern Gulf Coast.

Flooding Rainfall

Sally is expected to move slowly as it approaches the Gulf Coast, which means there is a serious threat of life-threatening flooding rainfall.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) says historic flooding is possible from Sally near and just inland from the northern Gulf Coast.

Sally’s highest rainfall totals, locally up to 30 inches, are expected from southeast Mississippi to coastal Alabama and the western Florida Panhandle. NOAA’s Weather Prediction Center has issued a rare high risk of excessive rainfall for this area into Wednesday.

Here is the latest rainfall forecast from the NHC.

-10 to 20 inches with locally up to 30 inches on the Gulf Coast from the western Florida Panhandle to southern Alabama and far southeastern Mississippi through Wednesday. Serious flash flooding and moderate to major river flooding could occur in these areas. Nearly a dozen river gauges in this region are forecast to reach major flood stage, according to NOAA.

-4 to 8 inches, with locally up to 12 inches, is possible farther inland across southeastern Mississippi, southern and central Alabama, northern Georgia and the western Carolinas. Significant flash and urban flooding is likely, as well as widespread minor to moderate flooding on some rivers in these areas.

Flood watches have been issued by the National Weather Service in portions of the Florida Panhandle, southern and central Alabama and southern Mississippi.

Damaging Winds

Strong, damaging winds will impact the Gulf Coast near where Sally moves inland, particularly in the hurricane warning area from coastal Mississippi to coastal Alabama and the western Florida Panhandle.

The winds could contribute to some structural damage, downed trees and power outages.

Here is the latest wind gust forecast. Changes to this forecast are likely depending on the exact future track and intensity of Sally.
Tornadoes

There will be an increasing chance of isolated tornadoes from Sally on Tuesday, from southeast Mississippi to southern Alabama and portions of the Florida Panhandle.

The isolated tornado threat might continue on Wednesday in parts of southern Alabama, the Florida Panhandle and southwest Georgia

Sally Recap So Far
Tropical Depression Nineteen formed Friday afternoon and made landfall in South Florida by early Saturday morning.

The tropical depression strengthened into Tropical Storm Sally once it moved over the southeast Gulf of Mexico on Saturday afternoon.

Flooding rainfall soaked parts of the Florida Keys on Saturday. Some areas in the Keys picked up nearly a foot of rainfall.

Sally brought rainfall to western parts of Florida on Sunday as it moved northward over the eastern Gulf of Mexico

Mississippi, Louisiana Order Evacuations and Make Final Preparations in Advance of a Strengthening Sally

Mississippi, Louisiana Order Evacuations and Make Final Preparations in Advance of a Strengthening Sally

  • Governors in Louisiana and Mississippi declared states of emergency.

  • The mayor of New Orleans tells residents living outside the levee system to evacuate.

  • Several other parishes in Louisiana and a county in Mississippi also ordered mandatory evacuations.

  • Schools are closed or dismissing early on Monday in many locations.

Parishes and counties along the coasts of Louisiana and Mississippi ordered evacuations and made last-minute preparations Monday as Tropical Storm Sally strengthened in the Gulf of Mexico. The storm is expected to be a hurricane when it makes landfall late Monday or early Tuesday. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards and Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves have declared states of emergency for their states. “We have every reason to believe that this storm represents a very significant threat to the people of Southeast Louisiana,” Edwards said at a briefing Sunday afternoon. In his briefing Sunday, Gov. Reeves said, “It needs to be understood by all of our friends in the coastal region and in south Mississippi that if you live in low-lying areas, the time to get out is early tomorrow morning.” Louisiana In New Orleans, the mayor issued a mandatory evacuation order for residents living outside of the parish’s levee protection system: Venetian Isle, Irish Bayou and Lake Catherine. Those areas could see storm surge of 7 to 9 feet, the National Weather Service said. The city’s Sewerage and Water Board said all 99 of the city’s drainage pumps are available for service. The other two were under repair and expected to be up and running ahead of any potential impacts from the storm. The town of Grand Isle, Louisiana, on a tiny barrier island in the Gulf, also issued a mandatory evacuation order to begin at 9 a.m. Sunday. Mayor David Camardelle already had asked campers, RVs and boats to leave the island beginning at 8 a.m. Sunday. Mandatory evacuations were ordered in the Jean Lafitte area of Jefferson Parish, too, including Barataria and Crown Point. All of Jefferson’s 192 drainage pumps are operating, Parish President Cynthia Lee Sheng said Sunday. “What happened in the past doesn’t matter,” Lee Sheng said at news conference. “We handle every threat the same … You can’t say, ‘I’m tired of this, I don’t want to do it.’ It doesn’t matter what kind of year we’ve had … we still have a major threat in front of us.” Mandatory evacuations were ordered in St. John the Baptist Parish for Pleasure Bend and low-lying areas of the parish north of Interstate 10 in LaPlace, including Frenier, Peavine and Manchac. A voluntary evacuation order is in place for the rest of the parish. Plaquemines Parish ordered mandatory evacuations for the entire East Bank of the parish and on the West Bank from Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery to Venice. A voluntary evacuation is in place from the community of Oakville to the Phillips 66 Alliance Refinery. President Matthew Jewell ordered a mandatory evacuation for all St. Charles Parish residents, saying Sally could cause widespread power outages and cut off the availability of crucial and emergency services. “We want residents to head our warnings and make preparations to leave now,” Jewell said Sunday. Several parishes announced schools would be closed Monday and Tuesday, including Jefferson, Lafourche, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Charles, St. John the Baptist and Terrebonne parishes. In Orleans Parish, all Monday courses will be delivered online. No face-to-face courses will meet on campus on Monday. All Tuesday classes (in-person, online and hybrid) are canceled. Loyola University will have classes Monday until 4 p.m. but will be closed Tuesday. The University of Holy Cross, Nunez Community College and New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary all plan to close. The Louisiana National Guard tweeted that more than 1,200 soldiers and airmen along with 51 high-water vehicles, 32 boats, eight helicopters, and two engineer work teams were being deployed in southeast Louisiana in preparation for Sally. Sally arrives less than three weeks after Hurricane Laura came ashore in Louisiana as a Category 4 storm on Aug. 27. Mississippi “Right now, I’m doing what everybody else that has any sense would do,” said Al Ward as he stocked up on propane Sunday at a hardware store in Gulfport, Mississippi. “I’m being prepared for the worst and hoping it will be as it has been earlier this year. We dodged the bullet.” Ward told WLOX he has dealt with a hurricane every year since moving to the coast. “If you want to enjoy the pleasures of what’s down here in South Mississippi, there are hazards that go with it as well.” he said. Ward was one of many in south Mississippi preparing for Sally’s arrival. Hancock County Emergency Management issued a mandatory evacuation beginning at 7 a.m. Monday for all low lying areas, residents living on rivers, river inlets, bayous, creeks, and in travel trailers. Also, modular homes, mobile homes, homes under construction and or partially constructed homes. Officials in Pascagoula, Long Beach, Gulfport, Pass Christian and Biloxi told boat owners to move their vessels out of city marinas and harbors, WLOX reported. Many schools along the coast announced they would dismiss students early Monday or close altogether. Districts that planned to close included Hancock County, Bay Waveland and Long Beach. Officials in Hancock, Harrison and Jackson counties set up sandbag stations, WXXV reported. Gulf Islands National Seashore closed islands and mainland areas of the national park in Florida and Mississippi because of Sally. The Davis Bayou Area and Mississippi islands including Petit Bois, West Petit Bois, Horn, Ship, and the NPS-owned portion of Cat Island closed at 5 p.m. Saturday. Campers at the Davis Bayou campground were told to evacuate by 9 a.m. Sunday. Alabama In Alabama, Gov. Kay Ivey urged residents to prepare and stay informed about Sally’s path, The Associated Press reported. “It is likely that this storm system will be impacting Alabama’s Gulf Coast. While it is currently not being predicted as a direct hit to our coastal areas, we know well that we should not take the threat lightly,” Ivey said. Mobile County public schools and Gulf Shores City schools will be closed on Monday, WALA reported. The University of South Alabama moved Monday and Tuesday classes online. The Baldwin County Commission was having an emergency meeting Monday morning to discuss preparations for Sally. On Dauphin Island, Mayor Jeff Collier told residents to be ready for the storm. ”Once the conditions change, you don’t have a chance to tweak your plan, so we just need to go ahead and be prepared for the worst case scenario, and then as they say hope for the best,” Collier said. Monday morning, Collier announced on his Facebook page that flooding was already happening on the west end of Dauphin Island. Gulf Shores lifeguards closed the waters to the public Sunday night because of the high risk of rip currents, WALA reported. Florida Santa Rosa County and Escambia County schools closed Monday because of Sally, the Pensacola News Journal reported. The University of West Florida announced all of its in-person classes are either going fully remote or are canceled from noon Monday through Tuesday. Pensacola State College closed Monday, too.